Albion and Jerusalem: The Anglo-Jewish Community in the by Michael Clark

By Michael Clark

Lionel de Rothschild's hard-fought access into Parliament in 1858 marked the emancipation of Jews in Britain--the symbolic end of Jews' crusade for equivalent rights and their inclusion as electorate after centuries of discrimination. Jewish lifestyles entered a brand new part: the post-emancipation period. yet what did this suggest for the Jewish neighborhood and their interactions with wider society? and the way did Britain's kingdom and society react to its most recent electorate? Emancipation was once ambiguous. attractiveness carried expectancies, in addition to possibilities. Integrating into British society required adjustments to conventional Jewish identification, simply because it additionally widened conceptions of Britishness. Many Jews willingly embraced their setting and formed a distinct Jewish life: blending in all degrees of society; experiencing fiscal good fortune; and setting up and translating its religion alongside Anglican grounds. although, not like many different ecu Jews, Anglo-Jews stayed dependable to their religion. Conversion and outmarriage remained infrequent, and connections have been maintained with international relations. The group used to be even keen from time to time to put its Jewish and English identification in clash, as occurred through the 1876-8 jap Crisis--which provoked the 1st episode of recent antisemitism in Britain. the character of Jewish life in Britain used to be uncertain and constructing within the post-emancipation period. Focusing upon inter-linked case experiences of Anglo-Jewry's political task, inner govt, and non secular improvement, Michael Clark explores the dilemmas of identification and inter-faith family that faced the minority in overdue nineteenth-century Britain. This was once an important interval within which the Anglo-Jewish neighborhood formed the foundation of its sleek life, when the British nation explored the bounds of its toleration.

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Additional info for Albion and Jerusalem: The Anglo-Jewish Community in the Post-Emancipation Era

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III There was another aspect to communal developments in the emancipation era. On the Continent most Jews were bound into statutorily regulated communities, where membership was compulsory and legal powers existed to enforce cohesion. In Britain the group operated within an associational framework with no powers of coercion beyond social exclusion. To this unregulated situation emancipation presented several problems. How was the community to be governed when equality placed the relationship between Jews and the state on a completely individual basis?

The other main Jewish strategy—a pragmatic, step-by-step acceptance of rights as they were offered—was both more realistic and successful, being more in tune with the habits of the legislature, which was wary of dry principle but receptive to practical advance. For the middle section of Jewry this approach had the advantage of ensuring their demands did not outstrip the pace of Gentile acceptance whilst also allowing them to keep a closer watch over their traditions. ⁴² A more active interpretation of this approach was pursued by David Salomons, whose idea was to progressively obtain honours barred to Jews, fulfil them, and thereby force the removal of what had become a practical grievance rather than a theoretical hardship.

Since other minorities had been granted equality under the liberal principles governing British politics, it was inconsistent and irrational to deny it to Jews, ran the logic. This approach had suffered an early blow in 1830 with the rejection of the first relief proposal, and with continuous resistance from the Lords, it became increasingly obvious by the later 1830s that a doctrinaire appeal was not going to achieve its goal. The other main Jewish strategy—a pragmatic, step-by-step acceptance of rights as they were offered—was both more realistic and successful, being more in tune with the habits of the legislature, which was wary of dry principle but receptive to practical advance.

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